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CONCUSSION AWARENESS

GUIDE FOR PARENTS

Our Concussion Awareness program is meant to be informative for both the parents and athletes.   Concussions are serious business sometimes requiring medical attention.  The following guideline is intended for information and awareness  on concussions - what they are, what the symptoms, and what you should do if you think you have a concussion.
 

The information contained in this website is provided for information purposes ONLY and in no way whatsoever should be relied on as medical advice or as a substitute for consulting your personal physician(s) and other health care professionals.  Therefore, any communications and/or information received from/or communicated here within should not be considered medical advice and you should always follow the medical advice, guidance and recommendations of your physician(s) and other health care professions.


WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?

  • A concussion is a brain injury which results in a temporary disruption of normal brain function.  A concussion occurs when the brain is violently rocked back and forth or twisted inside the skull as a result of a blow to the head or body.  An athlete does not have to lose consciousness to suffer a concussion.


CONCUSSION FACTS:

  • Concussions occur most frequently in football, but girl's lacrosse, girls soccer, boys lacrosse, wrestling and girls basketball follow closely behind.  All athletes are at risk.
  • Concussion symptoms may last from a few days to several months.
  • An athlete should not return to sports while still having symptoms from a concussion as they are at risk for prolonged symptoms and further injury.
  • A concussion may cause multiple symptoms.  Many symptoms appear immediately after the injury while others may develop over the next several days or weeks.
SIGNS OBSERVED BY PARENTS AND COACHES:
  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about what to do
  • Forgets plays
  • Is unsure of game, Score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Loses consciousness
  • Shows behavior or personality changes
  • Cannot recall events prior to hit
  • Cannot recall events after hit


SYMPTOMS REPORTED BY ATHLETE:
  • Headache or "pressure" in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • double or blurry vision
  • Bothered by light or noise
  • feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Difficulty paying attention
  • Memory problems
  • Confusion

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I THINK MY CHILD HAS SUFFERED A CONCUSSION?
  • Remove them from further play, be it a game or practice in or out of school
  • Contact the coach, administration, or teacher
  • Continuing to participate in physical activity after a concussion can lead to worsening concussion symptoms, increase risk for further injury and even death.
  • Have a medical professional diagnose the individual
  • WHEN IN DOUBT, SIT THEM OUT

WHEN CAN THE ATHLETE RETURN TO PLAY?
  • No athlete should return to play or practice on the same day after suffering a concussion
  • Athlete must be evaluated by a health care professional and be cleared before returning
  • Once cleared, he/she should proceed with activity in a step-wise fashion to allow the brain to re-adjust to exertion

STEPS TO FOLLOW AFTER CLEARED BY MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL:
  • Step 1 Light exercise, including walking or riding and exercise bike. No weight lifting.
  • Step 2 Running in the gym or on the filed.  No helmet or other equipment.
  • Step 3 Non-contact training drills in full equipment.  Weight training can begin.
  • Step 4 Full contact practice or training.
  • Step 5 Game play.
NOTE:  If symptoms occur in any step, the athlete should cease activity and be-reevaluated by their health care provider.
 

WHAT CAN I DO AS A PARENT?
  • Both you and your child should learn to recognize the "Signs and Symptoms" of concussion.
  • Instruct your child to tell the coach if he/she experience concussion symptoms.
  • Instruct your child to tell the coach if he/she suspects that a teammate has a concussion.
  • Ask teachers to monitor/report any decrease in grades or changes in behavior that could indicate a concussion.
  • Report concussion to the coaches and athletic trainer to help in monitoring injured athletes as they move to the next sports season.
ATHLETES RECOVERING FROM A CONCUSSION NEED REST